2021: A Year in Review

2021: A Year in Review

Only a year ago, stories about supply chains were seldom featured in the media. As we arrive at the close of 2021, news stories focusing on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on supply chains is provided daily, and reports in the media have made consumers increasingly aware of where the goods they purchase come from, how they are made, and who works to harvest, produce, and deliver those goods.

What We’re Talking About in July 2021

What We’re Talking About in July 2021

2021 ITUC Global Rights Index Published | Five Corridors Project Releases Reports on the Fair Recruitment of Migrant Workers | U.S. to Downgrade Malaysia to Lowest Tier in Trafficking Report | Dozens Die in Bangladesh Factory Fire | Ending Human Trafficking in the Twenty-First Century | International Treaty Addresses Violence and Harassment | Report finds high risk of slavery in Canadian Supply Chains

What We’re Talking About in February 2021

What We’re Talking About in February 2021

Study Explores the Response of the Private Sector to COVID-19 | Mars Wrigley Cocoa for Generations Program Releases Report on Its Human Rights Efforts in Cocoa | Federal Labor Standards Enforcement in Agriculture | Developing Freedom: The Sustainable Development Case for Ending Modern Slavery, Forced Labor, and Human Trafficking | Migrants Are Doing the Jobs South Koreans Sneer At | Labor groups launch website to promote new approach for achieving living wages in the garment industry | Labor Groups Launch Website to Promote New Approach for Achieving Living Wages in the Garment Industry

Ethical Recruitment Remains Elusive in Global Supply Chains: Learnings From Verité’s Remote CUMULUS Forced Labor Screen™ Platform

Ethical Recruitment Remains Elusive in Global Supply Chains: Learnings From Verité’s Remote CUMULUS Forced Labor Screen™ Platform

Despite the growing awareness of, and commitments to, ethical recruitment, an analysis of CUMULUS data from early 2019 to the present reveals that less than five percent of employers fully absorb the true cost of cross border recruitment, including all recruitment fees and related costs. Instead, those costs continue to be passed on to foreign migrant workers.