Melons

Melons

Melon Countries Where Melon is Reportedly Produced with Forced Labor and/or Child Labor Honduras (CL) Mexico (CL) Panama (CL) Where is melon reportedly produced with trafficking and/or child labor? According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s 2016 List of Goods...
Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

As the minutes ticked by on the afternoon of April 28, 2015, Harold Vilches watched stoically while customs officers at Santiago’s international airport scrutinized his carry-on. Inside the roller bag was 44 pounds of solid gold, worth almost $800,000, and all the baby-faced, 21-year-old college student wanted was clearance to get on a red-eye to Miami. Vilches had arrived at the airport six hours early because he thought there might be some trouble—he’d heard that customs had recently seized shipments from competing smugglers. But Vilches had done this run, or sent people to do it, more than a dozen times, and he’d prepared his falsified export paperwork with extra care. He was pretty sure he wouldn’t have any trouble. While he waited, he texted his contacts in Florida, telling them he’d already cleared customs. The plan was to hand off the gold at the Miami airport to a pair of guards, who would load it into an armored truck for the short trip to NTR Metals Miami LLC, a company that buys gold in quantities large and small and sells it into the global supply chain.

CNBC

CNBC

In Thailand thousands of “sea slaves,” held captive in shoddy fishing vessels, trawl for cheap forage fish used in canned pet food. In Pakistan, children as young as five are sold or kidnapped and forced to stand knee-deep in water, packing clay into molds to make bricks. In Ghana, poisonous dust and exposure to toxic chemicals and mine collapses threaten the health and safety of children who work in the artisanal gold mines.

Reuters

Reuters

Nestor Molina has made a living looking for Honduran workers to pick fruit in Florida. Now, some of the workers he recruited, their lawyers, and the U.S. government are looking for him. Molina, 53, is among the middlemen hired by companies to help bring foreign workers to the United States for temporary jobs. The jobs span almost every industry, from agriculture to hospitality, and the numbers of foreign workers brought to the United States have swelled in the past two decades. In the fiscal year ending last August, the government issued more than 350,000 temporary work visas.

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

A worker loads just-picked Roma tomatoes at Agricola El Porvenir. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times) Read the full-text of the article below or on The Los Angeles Times Website. Editorial U.S. firms, consumers can’t ignore abuses against Mexican farmworkers...