Strawberries

Strawberries

Strawberries Countries Where Strawberries are Reportedly Produced with Forced Labor and/or Child Labor Argentina (CL) Where are strawberries reportedly produced with trafficking and/or child labor? According to the U.S. Department of Labor 2016 List of Goods Produced...
Pineapples

Pineapples

Pineapples Countries Where Pineapples are Reportedly Produced with Forced Labor and/or Child Labor Brazil (CL) Côte d’Ivoire (FL)   Where are pineapples reportedly produced with trafficking and/or child labor? The U.S. Department of State 2017 Trafficking in...
Bananas

Bananas

Bananas Countries Where Bananas are Reportedly Produced with Forced Labor and/or Child Labor Belize (CL) Ecuador (CL, FL) Nicaragua (CL) The Philippines (CL) Where are bananas reportedly produced with trafficking and/or child labor? According to the U.S. Department of...
Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

As the minutes ticked by on the afternoon of April 28, 2015, Harold Vilches watched stoically while customs officers at Santiago’s international airport scrutinized his carry-on. Inside the roller bag was 44 pounds of solid gold, worth almost $800,000, and all the baby-faced, 21-year-old college student wanted was clearance to get on a red-eye to Miami. Vilches had arrived at the airport six hours early because he thought there might be some trouble—he’d heard that customs had recently seized shipments from competing smugglers. But Vilches had done this run, or sent people to do it, more than a dozen times, and he’d prepared his falsified export paperwork with extra care. He was pretty sure he wouldn’t have any trouble. While he waited, he texted his contacts in Florida, telling them he’d already cleared customs. The plan was to hand off the gold at the Miami airport to a pair of guards, who would load it into an armored truck for the short trip to NTR Metals Miami LLC, a company that buys gold in quantities large and small and sells it into the global supply chain.

Our Work in Seafood

Our Work in Seafood

The fishing and aquaculture sector is currently one of the world’s fastest growing sectors, with more than 58 million men, women and children involved in fishing and aquaculture globally, according to a 2014 UN FAO report. With the rapid expansion of the sector has come an increase in illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing, a practice that heightens the likelihood of over-fishing and increases risks of labor abuses, as vessels undertake longer and longer voyages in order to find fish, trapping their crews on board for longer and longer periods of time.