Measuring Forced Labor

Measuring Forced Labor

Earlier this month, Verité was pleased to participate in the first meeting of the International Labor Organization’s (ILO’s) Working Group on Forced Labor Statistics, which aims to inform the discussion on measurement of forced labor at the 20th International Conference of Labor Statisticians (ICLS). The meeting took place in Rio de Janeiro and was hosted and co-organized by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics.

2017 Year in Review

2017 Year in Review

Verité’s vision is a world where people work under safe, fair, and legal conditions. In 2017, we conducted ground-breaking research, amplified our impact, and engaged multinational brands in long-term strategic partnerships towards making this vision a reality. Explore our achievements from last year below, and to support Verité’s work in 2018, please DONATE NOW.

Verité Pilots Participatory Impact Evaluation Technique

Verité Pilots Participatory Impact Evaluation Technique

Gaining insight into impact is in many ways the next frontier in supply chain accountability. Companies working to promote responsible practices need ways to track the effects their programs are having, both to determine whether problems are in fact being solved (and resources well spent), and to identify ways to improve existing programming. With demands for more and better transparency from companies on their supply chain efforts, the need to demonstrate authentic impact grows. Evaluation of social impact can be difficult to do well, however, particularly where programs are multi-dimensional and ongoing, and attribution of observed changes to particular interventions is not straightforward.

Best Practices in Credible Forced Labor Disclosures

Best Practices in Credible Forced Labor Disclosures

Many company’s forced labor, human trafficking, or ‘modern day slavery’ disclosures – whether mandated by transparency regulations or part of broader sustainability, corporate social responsibility, or human rights reporting – do not reflect a credible understanding of how specific practices of value chain partners and recruitment intermediaries in their supply chains expose vulnerable workers to the risk of forced labor. Consequently, many of the detection and prevention efforts outlined in these disclosures are not sufficiently targeted to effectively address the root causes of these insidious and deeply entrenched abuses.