At Risk in the Recycling Sector Supply Chain

At Risk in the Recycling Sector Supply Chain

You have likely seen the photos of children from around the world scavenging gutters and mountains of garbage. You might not, however, associate those photos with positive ecological stories about recycling, circular supply chains, and the benefits of buying products that incorporate recycled content.The environmental benefits of the large-scale recycling industry are significant — landfill waste is reduced, pollution is minimized, greenhouse gases are reduced, and natural resources are preserved, among others. In many locations, the recycling sector is rapidly expanding as companies, governments, and NGOs recognize the critical impact recycling can make.However, what is often hidden in these efforts are the abusive and often hazardous conditions under which material is collected for reuse.

Improving the Enforcement of Child Labor Laws in Five Countries

Improving the Enforcement of Child Labor Laws in Five Countries

The International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates that 152 million children worldwide are engaged in child labor. For the past four years, Verité partnered with Winrock International and Lawyers Without Borders to address this problem by providing technical assistance to governments in five countries: Burkina Faso, Liberia, Nepal, Belize, and Panama. The CLEAR II project (Country Level Engagement and Assistance to Reduce Child Labor), funded by the US Department of Labor, had three goals: to improve governments’ response to child labor, decrease the number of children exploited, and increase awareness of child labor in the private sector.