Verité Appoints Shawn MacDonald as CEO

Verité Appoints Shawn MacDonald as CEO

Verité’s Board of Directors is extremely pleased to announce that Dr. Shawn MacDonald has been appointed as Verité’s next Chief Executive Officer. MacDonald replaces Dan Viederman, who left in March to take a new position with Humanity United, a long-time Verité partner where he will work to further that organization’s mission to bring new approaches to complicated and urgent problems like forced labor.

The Oceans and Fisheries Partnership

The Oceans and Fisheries Partnership

Verité is currently collaborating with Tetra Tech ARD on the USAID Oceans and Fisheries Partnership (USAID Oceans), a program designed to combat illegal, unregulated, and unreported (IUU) fishing and protect marine biodiversity in the Asia-Pacific region. In addition to protecting marine biodiversity and enhancing sustainability, the program’s focus on related human welfare issues, such as gender equality and labor rights, addresses the multi-faceted and interrelated nature of social and environmental challenges.

KnowTheChain Releases Bechmark Report on Forced Labor

KnowTheChain Releases Bechmark Report on Forced Labor

KnowTheChain, a resource for businesses and investors who need to understand and address forced labor abuses within their supply chains, released a new report this month benchmarking global information and communications technology (ICT) companies’ efforts to eradicate forced labor in the production and manufacturing of their goods.

Verité Participates in World Day Against Child Labor

Verité Participates in World Day Against Child Labor

Every year on June 12th, the international community commemorates World Day Against Child Labor in order to raise awareness and focus attention on how best to eliminate the exploitation of children in the workplace. This year’s theme “Ending Child Labor in Supply Chains” emphasized the fact that 168 million children are still engaged in child labor, many of whom work to produce internationally traded goods and services, or items destined for national consumption. Because child labor is most often performed at the lower level of supply chains in small workshops or home businesses where labor inspectors have difficulty reaching, and where trade unions and employer organizations are absent, it is incumbent on everyone, including governments, NGOs, businesses and consumers to take action to address the issue.